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/civ/ - Civics
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Anonymous 18/05/17(Thu)07:16 No. 762 ID: 3a3089 [Reply]
762

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If the Kent State students had been armed in 1970, the Ohio National Guard would have killed them all.

They were protesting for peace; they didn't want to have to carry guns, kill people, or fear for their lives--and four of them were killed for it.

Peace is not derived from armament. Deterrents are an inherently short-sighted solution: they only pause an enemy who has already decided to attack you until they acquire equal or better weapons. Best case scenario, the peace of the gun lasts only as long as no one gets angry enough or crazy enough to risk mutual annihilation--someone like that will always be around.


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Anonymous 18/05/26(Sat)14:54 No. 787 ID: ead321
787

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>>777
Did you check out how many guns the Vegas shooter had? These aren't people with thousands of firearms. Just having more than a half dozen puts you above the range of a normal gun owner. Most only have one or two.

But one thing is for sure though, most gun owners can't be trusted to properly secure their firearms. Because if you think the gubbermint is going to break down your door at any moment for years on end you can't properly secure your guns. You have to make sure you can commit suicide by cop. Otherwise your family would have to (gasp) sell your guns to try and get some semblance of an inheritance. And that's the worst fate of all. Your guns are more important than your life.

>>778
>Actually, the nuts hoarding guns tend to be mass murdered
Not really. They tend to end up "accidentally" shooting people.

Which is why the NRA is so adamant that there be no limits on the second amendment. If irresponsible ammosexuals were no longer able to purchase firearms, gun sales would plummet, and the NRA slush funds would dry up.


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Anonymous 18/05/29(Tue)08:34 No. 800 ID: e7aae7

>>787
I was thinking Waco, Ruby Ridge, etc. I guess the point there being that they hoarded enough weapons to get the government's attention, and then they were murdered (and helpless to defend themselves against overwhelming numbers, tactics, and armament).

>most gun owners can't be trusted to properly secure their firearms
Apparently this is how you defend your children's freedom to mass murder.

>Vegas shooter
There's a conspiracy theory that this was an arms deal gone bad, that the guy accused of the shooting was laying dead on the floor the whole time, and that his customers escaped--some of them firing shots in nearby streets on their way out. Normally I wouldn't give it much thought, but I noticed a number of articles have recently been revised to make the guy sound more creepy and mentally disturbed--none of that was in the interviews people did in the days immediately following the incident; it was added months later. Then again, it's probably just a story and the later additions might just be the NRA's usual tactic of portraying any mass shooter as a deranged individual who shouldn't have passed the background checks. That's the one angle they're willing to give, since they know background checks are useless--saying they'll support stronger background checks lets them sound like they actually care without making any change to their arrangment with the politicians and gun manufacturers.


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Anonymous 18/05/30(Wed)20:31 No. 803 ID: ead321
803

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>>800
>Apparently this is how you defend your children's freedom to mass murder.
Coming soon in the 71st amendment.

>There's a conspiracy theory that this was an arms deal gone bad
There's a conspiracy theory for everything. Conspiracy theories are supported by people who demand that everything fit their preconceived narrative of the world. They see nothing wrong with on one breath talking about how the government is completely incompetent and can't do anything right, while in the next breath talking about how the government is behind all these massive super complicated conspiracies that would require superhuman levels of coordination if not outright telepathic communication.




Anonymous 16/11/13(Sun)06:06 No. 15 ID: 7676eb [Reply]
15

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I’ve been thinking a lot about the meeting between Trump and Obama at the White House, and here’s the thing.

Obama used to be a law professor. This is key.

Law school is so, so different from college.

In college, everyone expects there to be a “syllabus day,” kind of a grace period where they can show up and get the lay of the land, figure out the bare minimum that they can get away with, the TA gives everyone their office hours, there’s an introductory lecture, and everybody leaves a few minutes early to go take a nap or something. You do the bullshit assignments, you say something in class now and then to get your participation check mark, and figure out how badly you can do on the final and still pass.

But see, in law school, all the methodologies you’ve spent the last 17 years operating under go out the window. Day one of law school is you being thrown into the deep end of the pool—you’ve had a homework assignment for two weeks now, and it’s to read the first 200 pages of your casebook. And now it’s you and the teacher (who is usually as smug as Alex Trebek) gauging and assessing what you managed to absorb while you skimmed through all those pages of reading so you could hurry up and get to the other 150 pages of reading for your next period class, in front of 50 people who are all smarter than you. And if you fuck up, or you didn’t do the reading, you are at the mercies of not just the professor, but the silent satisfied judgment of your peers.

Law school is hard, and it will make you feel stupid and tongue-tied and like you don’t know anything and can’t form an argument—because you don’t, and you can’t. Everybody there has had a 4.0 since birth. Everybody there was the smartest kid in their class, and you’re all rabidly competing for a sliver of a chance at something down the road. It’s petty, and savage, fiercely entrenched in a culture of formalities and ceremony, and exactly like Washington DC.

Yesterday when I was driving home, the NPR reporter talking about the Oval Office meeting mentioned that Trump had thought it was going to be a “getting to know you” type meeting, but that he was surprised when Obama stretched their talk out to 90 minutes before sending him along to the Capitol building where he met with congressional leaders for more lengthy meetings and stuff he didn’t want to do.

And he hasn’t even gotten to the actual job yet.
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Anonymous 18/05/29(Tue)08:03 No. 799 ID: e7aae7

>>798
That's pretty much what I posted, except to point out that there's nothing new about it. Yeah, the "everyman" shtick is old, but at least before mass media I could excuse people for not really knowing much about the candidate's personal lives. Now it should be the most embarrasing and shameful ruse that no politician could ever pull off with a straight face, but it seems to work even more effectively than ever now that they can smear that bullshit all over the country in nanoseconds.


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Anonymous 18/05/29(Tue)17:45 No. 801 ID: 7274a1

>>799
Mass media has been around since the 50's, but it used to have a censor for lies and inappropriate opinions.

Since the internet anybody can spread whatever bullshit they want about anything across the world and some people will believe it because they're stupid or biased or gullible or too lazy to do they're own research.


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Anonymous 18/05/30(Wed)20:24 No. 802 ID: ead321

>>801
Actually no, it really started in earnest in the 80s when the Fairness doctrine was abolished by Raygun. Without that the entire right wing media fantasy bubble would never have been allowed. The internet was just the cherry on top.




Anonymous 18/04/04(Wed)06:44 No. 597 ID: 58fd5a [Reply]
597

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Every three days or so, there's dire news about Tesla's future, followed soon after by glowing sales reports or new innovations.

This stock is being manipulated by the media in a really predictable way. I'm thinking about investing at the next cycle.


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Anonymous 18/05/18(Fri)16:45 No. 763 ID: ea6eb9

not worth it, buy stock in ceiling fans, i predict they are all the rage in 2044.


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Anonymous 18/05/24(Thu)02:19 No. 775 ID: 2be65b

>>763
yesterday's headline: Tesla must sell expensive hi-spec 3s before mass-production type can roll out, or die!
today's headline: Finally, good news for Tesla! Tariff reduction in China likely to boost Tesla sales; Ys coming.

I'm on the fence.

>2044
Assuming there's any /civ/ilization left to use them.


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Anonymous 18/08/12(Sun)14:01 No. 881 ID: cbc430

>>775
In 2044 a ceiling fan will be an indentured child you attach to your ceiling, who waves their limbs around to cause air movement on command.




Anonymous 18/05/12(Sat)15:44 No. 757 ID: f387da [Reply]
757

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>implies that any possible corruption scandal involving the presidential campaign would be a matter internal to the Executive branch to prosecute.
No, the fuck, it isn't. This guy slept in 7th grade /Civ/ics? The separation of powers? Yeah? Only Congress has the authority to impeach the Executive. Is this guy just stupid or is this some kind of mind game (lefty talk show host doesn't make a point of it, shakes hands for this explanation) trying to sell the rest of slept-through-7th-grade America that the Congress isn't resposible to contain the Executive?

Fire, Wind, Water, Earth, Heart? Not everything is fixed by Captain Planet; sometimes the Planeteers have to act on their own.




Anonymous 17/11/01(Wed)17:56 No. 457 ID: 873203 [Reply]
457

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Harvey Weinstein isn't a tipping point; he's the point of no return.


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Anonymous 18/04/11(Wed)04:13 No. 613 ID: a870df
613

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>>612
Just stop, you're only further embarrassing yourself.


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Anonymous 18/04/11(Wed)04:20 No. 614 ID: f871fd

>>613
I honestly don't think I could be embarrassed next to you guys.


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Anonymous 18/04/13(Fri)01:36 No. 618 ID: a870df

>>614
In any given group of idiots, there's always going to be one who's slower than the rest.

You're that guy.




Anonymous 18/04/02(Mon)19:52 No. 594 ID: e01f09 [Reply]
594

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Nothing about this surprises me except how blatant it is.


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Anonymous 18/04/04(Wed)00:37 No. 595 ID: 32a48d

They canceled it.


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Anonymous 18/04/04(Wed)06:38 No. 596 ID: 58fd5a

>>595
I'm astonished. They had an opportunity to undermine the culture and prosperity of half a dozen "allies" by dumping thousands of subhumans on them and they gave it up! Kiked by their own kikes?

I'm sure they're just taking some time to research a more subtle way of doing this.


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Anonymous 18/04/04(Wed)07:01 No. 598 ID: de56af

>>596
Israeli Trump supporters felt that if they shipped 16,000 off that in a year they'd have 16 million expecting them to do the same.

In other words, it makes just as much sense as anything else Trump says.

We truly are living in The Stupid Ages.




Anonymous 17/11/27(Mon)00:25 No. 477 ID: ee2f87 [Reply]
477

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Just remember, anybody who doesn't want to go to war is gay.


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Anonymous 18/03/22(Thu)12:52 No. 575 ID: bf3618

>>574
It's only coordinated in the sense that their all playing the game.

Worst case scenario is Japan gets a little more nuclear radiation(they're used to it by now), everyone nukes nk(china loses a pawn, but keeps it's border proxy exchanging a hostile state for a nuclear wasteland), and then it's back to the status quo.


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Anonymous 18/03/22(Thu)14:31 No. 576 ID: c69d68

>>575
I have to thank you for this reply. It restores my faith in humanity, to a small degree, that at least one place exists where people who do not necessarily agree about political issues can talk about them and find common ground.


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Anonymous 18/03/26(Mon)06:19 No. 581 ID: 6636d3

>>576
Anytime. I try not to be a polarized idiot.




Anonymous 17/09/06(Wed)16:08 No. 420 ID: 9fd7e5 [Reply]
420

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So all the posting about the German election got deleted. Why? Even as a non-German I still find it useful to know what's going on in other countries and also to see what sort of trends might apply to where I live.

Right now it looks to me as though despite the number of people who loudly dislike Merkel and her party there are still enough who either don't dislike her as much or dislike the other parties more that she'll get first crack at forming a governing coalition.


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Anonymous 17/09/08(Fri)06:21 No. 422 ID: a4d268

Haben Sie Führerschein?


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Anonymous 17/10/06(Fri)20:58 No. 442 ID: 9fd7e5

So a Jamaica coalition, they say. This is what it'll be like:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OH9J-eBldeA


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Anonymous 18/03/14(Wed)18:35 No. 565 ID: 4089f6

>>442
lol j/k they formed another grand coalition just like both major parties said they wouldn't. Good job, Deutschbags.




Anonymous 17/12/16(Sat)15:09 No. 503 ID: 517b6e [Reply]
503

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So, the Trump administration is simply out to rape the United States and it's people in every which way it can and it's going to get away with it because they are too hopelessly divided on every issue to do anything for themselves.


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Anonymous 18/01/28(Sun)05:33 No. 553 ID: 1422fe

>>552
>seriously
You've made the classic blunder of mistaking derision and scorn for concern. Russia is teetering on the brink of collapse from economic sanctions (due to the miscalculation of the Crimea invasion) coupled with the global drop in oil & gas prices caused by the US flooding the market.

An opposition party has formed despite Putin making it illegal to hold demonstrations without preapproval from the government. Massive rallies are held in open defiance of his laws.

Putin not only cares, he's fucking terrified because he thinks all of this is the result of a massive CIA plot. By failing to accurately gauge the situation he's making tactical blunder after blunder, opening vulnerabilities to the very people he's counting on to carry him through no matter what - Russian citizens.

He can claim everyone who opposes him are Nazis only so many times before people will start to question why he always trots out the exact same bogeyman every time he encounters opposition. He's quickly reaching the tipping point of citizens unwilling to accept his lies (hence the massive demonstrations) and is simply too old, fat, and dull to find a new bogeyman, which leads to his mistakes piling up in a massive tower of failure that will eventually topple and fall, crushing his flabby body under it.

Stalin not only killed more people than Putin, he killed them openly and without fear of reprisal because he held absolute power over the country. Anyone who opposed him was either killed or sent off to gulags. Putin has to kill in secret. He can't risk openly killing anyone who opposes him because he knows this will result in his downfall. This is why he's far weaker than Stalin. He can't do what needs to be done to install himself as permanent dictator for life. Stalin killed millions of Russians to maintain his power. It takes Putin days, weeks, even months to kill just one. Time is a luxury no human can afford, since it catches up with us all in the end... and with old age comes dementia. For someone like Putin dementia is a fatal flaw.


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Anonymous 18/02/04(Sun)02:33 No. 554 ID: f55f63

>>553
>a massive CIA plot
Or a relatively tiny Secret Service propaganda taskforce, drumming up intelligence and prompting exaggerated responses on local media.

Have you been to Russia?


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Anonymous 18/02/04(Sun)02:40 No. 555 ID: 96f033

>>554
Have you been to America, comrade?

>Secret Service
Apparently all you know about the secret service is that it has the word "secret" in its name.




Anonymous 17/12/01(Fri)21:08 No. 485 ID: cfbfa4 [Reply]
485

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The proposal to turn the Internet into cable television:
http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2017/db1122/DOC-347927A1.pdf

This will be "considered" at the FCC's monthly meeting on December 14th.

It's not what I thought it was. I thought it would be about putting control of the internet into corporate hands, raising the cost of hosting and streaming services nationwide, and forcing the people to pay for access to individual web sites like cable TV channels. It does those things, but its higher priority is undoing things that were done during the previous administration. This is yet another attempt by the current administration to make the American people and the world forget there was ever a black president by erasing any trace of a political legacy that could be attributed to his leadership (even though the president has no authority to direct the FCC). Destroying the internet as we know it will be a side effect.

Specifically, the proposal reverses this order:
https://apps.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-15-24A1.pdf

Highlights:

Key to the proposal is defining broadband Internet access as a luxury, not a utility. Specifically, to reclassify broadband ISPs as Title I "information services", reversing their 2015 reclassification as Title II "telecommunications services" and bringing us back to 2014's Verizon Communications Inc. v. FCC, in which it was determined that the FCC relinquished the authority to regulate broadband ISPs blocking or throttling any information being transmitted through their networks by distinguishing them from "common carriers" as was confirmed in 2004's NCTA v. Brand X Internet Services.

The proposal repeats certain words and phrases to an almost hypnotic effect, among them "restore internet freedom" (what it purports to do) and "heavy-handed, utility-style regulation" (in reference to the 2015 order) and "light touch" (to describe it's strategy of regulation-free regulation that will magically prevent the telecom conglomerates from holding the internet for ransom).
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Anonymous 17/12/04(Mon)23:42 No. 487 ID: a870df
487

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What's real fun is that under Title I and without common carrier protections, they are liable for all traffic carried over their network.

If you commit a crime using their network, under Title I they're considered to be an accomplice to the crime. This is what common carrier prevented.

But because Verizon's execs want ever-greater forms of compensation, they sued common carrier out of the way, which lead to them being classified as Title II.

Now they're back to Title I without common carrier protections. Which means they're back to being liable for acts committed by customers using their network.

Almost every sketchy business that only accepts bitcoin as payment? ISPs are now liable for them. The act of receiving and transmitting information about the blockchain transaction? Liable.

They wanted it, they got it. And I hope they choke on it.


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Anonymous 17/12/09(Sat)10:56 No. 497 ID: a20cea

>>487
>under Title I they're considered to be an accomplice to the crime
They're just going to make that go away with lawyers and money you know.


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Anonymous 17/12/10(Sun)13:28 No. 498 ID: 15ac11
498

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>>497
They'd better beef up their legal departments, since they're accomplices on federal, state, and local levels.

Getting dragged into court in every municipality in the country tends to be a bit of a drain.

But I'm sure that the GOP, being such vocal supporters of state rights, would certainly never stand in their way.




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