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No Equipment Exercise Programs Pacer 18/03/04(Sun)10:56 No. 20516
20516

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I'm being moved by my work for six months to an area that has no gym or exercise equipment. My luggage is limited, but I have a bar thing that I can hook into a doorframe for pull/chin ups that I'm taking with.

Is there a decent calisthenics program that I can follow that will help me continue building strength/muscle?


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Anonymous 18/04/20(Fri)03:20 No. 20878
20878

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>>continue building strength/muscle

That depends on where you're at now. If you want to continue to increase your strength/hypertrophy, you're going to need to continue progressive overload. All bodyweight exercises involve lifting a percent of your bodyweight. If that's higher than the weight you can currently lift, then bodyweight will continue building strength and muscle. If not, it won't.

For an example, pullups done right involve 100% of your bodyweight. Imagine doing a lat pulldown at the gym with the weight equal to your bodyweight. (No, they're not exactly the same exercise, but they should be close enough for an estimate.) Can you do 3x8-12 of them? If yes, now try it with one arm. Can you still do it? If that's too heavy, then you can continue your gainz with a pullup bar by working to one arm pullups. If you're strong enough that it's no sweat, you'll have to find something heavier to continue to see growth.

You can always strap something heavy to yourself to increase the weight, of course. How doable that is will depend on the details of your situation. If you can already do a one-arm lat pulldown with weight equal to your bodyweight + a backpack filled with rocks, then you're pretty damn strong.


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Anonymous 18/04/20(Fri)03:54 No. 20879
20879

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>>20878 cont.

To actually answer your question, I'm a fan of Convict Conditioning, although I'd add inverted rows to the program. I also like all of Al Kavadlo's work, but most programs will be fine as long as you keep in mind progressive overload.

The basic idea is to try to find a decent balance of exercises and increase the weight you're pushing/pulling by moving to harder variations and, where appropriate, moving from two-handed/legged exercises to one-handed/legged exercises.

There are basically two things to avoid if you're working for strength:

One is endurance focused programs. It doesn't matter how many pushups you can do in a row, your strength won't increase after about 3x20, maybe even before that. You have to move to a harder variation. More specifically, you have to move to a variation that involves pushing a higher percentage of your bodyweight or concentrating that bodyweight on a smaller number of muscles (I.e., working to one-arm pushups with elevated feet).

The other is programs that focus too much on gymnastic skills. Reddit's recommended routine is fine, for example, but its focus involves more gymnastic skills than the ones I mentioned. Those skills are super cool and benefit your over-all athleticism and ability to avoid injury, but anything that isn't going to increase the amount of weight you're moving isn't going to help increase strength or hypertrophy. /r/bodyweight's sacred text, Overcoming Gravity, is a great resource, but there's a reason it puts "gymnastics" before "strength," in the subtitle, and it's the same reason the author, Steven Low, looks the way he does despite being able to perform some impressive feats of gymnastic skill and athleticism.

As an example, ring dips are harder than parallel bar dips for most people, but the added difficulty comes from stabilization and coordination, not from pushing more weight. Also, silly things like one-finger pushups are pretty much just gimmicks.

You can try to master both the gymnastic skills and the strength work, but most people end up choosing which is more important to them and neglecting the other--some gymnastic skills are pretty much impossible if you're too swole.


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Anonymous 18/04/20(Fri)04:01 No. 20880

>>20879
One last thing about Convict Conditioning: There are more incremental progressions than anyone actually needs. Start with the hardest one you can do safely and feel free to skip some of the progressions that are just minor variations. Also, the progression standards are way too many reps. 3x8-12 is fine.

Basically, this is all just stuff you already know if you've been lifting. It's just that there are a surprisingly large number of lifters who think that muscles suddenly work differently when they're lifting your own body.



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