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replacing speaker with 1/4" jack chrissychris 16/12/19(Mon)21:09 No. 16401 ID: 8ed2cc
16401

File 148217815616.jpg - (110.29KB , 1000x1000 , 7chan post photo.jpg )

Alrighty, I am looking for some help.

For the sake of experimentation and fun, I'd like to replace the speaker of a shitty kids toy (very similar to the one in the pic) with a 1/4" audio jack so it can play through a larger amp, possibly even through guitar effect pedals.

I've already tried this twice. Taken apart the toy, soldered in a 1/4" jack, and plugged it in. Both times I ended up with a reallyyyy spotty and quiet sound. At first I thought it may be a bad soldering job, but now I feel like it could be due to the low power of the toy, it takes 3 AA batteries.

So what's the deal here? Any ideas what could be wrong?


>>
Anonymous 17/01/01(Sun)23:02 No. 16405 ID: 67f38c

It has nothing to do with the electrical power. Real electric guitars don't have any batteries. The issue could be that the amp is designed to work with the signals from a guitar's pickup, which are probably not the same as the signals from a speaker. If I had to guess, the pickup would be taking the signals from each string individually, while the speaker from this kid's toy is taking the entire sound as a whole.

It's also possible that the teeny-tiny magnet in that speaker just isn't strong enough to send a strong signal. I'm not sure what you could do about this.




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