-  [WT]  [PS]  [Home] [Manage]

[Return]
Posting mode: Reply
  1.   (reply to 16539)
  2.   Help
  3. (for post and file deletion)
/sci/ - Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

Join us in IRC!

•This is not /b/ or /halp/. Tech support has its own board.
•If you are not contributing directly to a thread, sage your post.
•Keep the flaming at a minimum.
•Tripcodes⁄Namefags are not only tolerated here, they are encouraged.
•We are here to discuss sci-tech, not pseudoscience. Do not post off-topic.

•♥ Integris


  • Supported file types are: GIF, JPG, PNG, WEBM
  • Maximum file size allowed is 5120 KB.
  • Images greater than 200x200 pixels will be thumbnailed.
  • Currently 399 unique user posts. View catalog

  • Blotter updated: 2018-08-24 Show/Hide Show All

There's a new /777/ up, it's /gardening/ Check it out. Suggest new /777/s here.

Movies & TV 24/7 via Channel7: Web Player, .m3u file. Music via Radio7: Web Player, .m3u file.

WebM is now available sitewide! Please check this thread for more info.

Anonymous 17/08/28(Mon)20:04 No. 16539 ID: 269c1e
16539

File 150394348278.jpg - (28.69KB , 400x300 , bad-math-fotolia-29084487.jpg )

I'm hoping to return to college and do a second degree in math/a math related subject (ideally Computer Science). Unfortunately, I haven't done math in well over a decade, and when I did math previously it wasn't exactly the highest level math.

Can anyone recommend how I can best learn/re-learn/catch up to college level math and be ready and prepared?


>>
Anonymous 17/08/28(Mon)20:31 No. 16540 ID: 7983d8

Not trying to troll, but if math is what you need to recap on, get a math book.


>>
Anonymous 17/11/20(Mon)02:44 No. 16581 ID: b65d4e

So I know this is an older post but what the the heck.

Great math review site http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/
awesome math videos this guy will explain that shit real clear and easy https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoHhuummRZaIVX7bD4t2czg


>>
Anonymous 17/12/12(Tue)03:43 No. 16595 ID: 7332e9
16595

File 151304659797.gif - (0.97MB , 257x194 , 61821ef33dec6c32319b3fbd85b5869c083ed09fd13937ed22.gif )

My advice is to go through textbooks, and read them like you would an encyclopedia, just a rich conentrated resource full of info. As you read, compile a list of equaitons and concepts that serve as an outline of every major landmark of your learning. The goal of math learning is to wholely understand and to masterfully manipulate if you ask me; if you look at the textbook as a study guide while ytrying to understand each equation/concept it has to offer, you're done. With 80% of your development. Secondly is to drill in these equations and concepts until you feel yo have mastered them to what ever extend satsfies you. For me that means making my own tests and work sheets putting in random numbers and solving until i get some number correct in a row. Here I would say is the 100% mark of your journey in studying math. Then maybe mix and blend some concepts, play around with questions you have about whats posible, basically if you have time and drive, get creative with what youve learned. This is the last 10% of your 110% long journey.
As far as I can say, at that point you're done.

ethos: My passion for math and self taught math skills helped me skip almost two grades. I will major in math at Harvard this fall.

Knowing the source of info like this makes a big difference in how you take it. I once heard that to get better at maths you also need to practice the correct thinking methods and not drill in poor ones, or else you wont get any better. I was lead to belive that is not only futile but counterproductive to practice math unless you already know the correct/best methods for problem solving, orgaization, and avoiding simple mistakes. The unspoken context of this that I missed was that instead of trying desprately to start of your practicing with the correct methods, you should rather reach for perfection, fail, try and fail and try and try again until you find the right method for you (even if it means dirlling through wrong ones). What I shoul have done was tell myself that the advice I heard was directed at people who think that doing math without guiding your methods and mannerisms inorder to get better at it is indeed fruitful when in truth it is not.

I said all this because I want you to succeed in your campaign so I warn you of the dangers of taking advice without critical thinking and context of the advice.


>>
Anonymous 17/12/21(Thu)03:31 No. 16601 ID: 9050ad

to all, I second >>16596
I am >>16595
and all I have to add is that I think it would not be a waist of time to make sure you have mastered mental arithmetic up to [1-999]+ or -[1-999] and [1-99]x or /[1-99] where [1-99] is all numbers from 1 to 99, rather than negative 98.
It builds discipline and will help purge your soul of all 11+3=33 blemishes and 13+17=40 impurities. It makes you a stronger mathathlete and higher scoring student and I hope one of those is your aim, dear op.


>>
Anonymous 17/12/22(Fri)14:45 No. 16603 ID: f9cb15

>>16601
>I think it would not be a waist of time to make sure you have mastered mental arithmetic up to [1-999]+ or -[1-999] and [1-99]x or /[1-99]
Yes, it would be. Math is not arithmetic. Being able to multiply numbers in your head doesn't help you at all to, say, inductively prove that a given property is true for a particular infinite set of numbers.
Leave the mindless tasks to the machines.


>>
Anonymous 18/01/09(Tue)08:57 No. 16606 ID: 9050ad
16606

File 151548462941.gif - (1.29MB , 286x152 , B1A1ED9C-B6BB-4358-BC9D-6861C4254BAB.gif )

>>16603
You would have better inductive skills and clearer thinking with those numbers/concepts if you train your brain to handle more information at once by good arithmatic skills up to a certain point.
I didn’t make this up, my profsssor told me and didn’t believe him. Then I did it and it worked.


>>
Anonymous 18/01/09(Tue)09:01 No. 16607 ID: 9050ad

>>16603
And another thing, he’s trying to catch up to college level math. Mastering arithmatic is actually perfect for his goal. It will help him
thrive through algebra 1 to Calc 1 courses. He won’t make any simple mistakes and will constantly be focusing on the concepts at hand rather than the arithmatic that makes his answers correct.


>>
Anonymous 18/01/09(Tue)15:01 No. 16608 ID: f9cb15

>>16606
>You would have better inductive skills and clearer thinking with those numbers/concepts if you train your brain to handle more information at once by good arithmatic skills up to a certain point.
What a load of bullshit.
First off, nobody does arithmetic on more than a three or four digits on their head other than as a party trick. If you care about the correctness of your results you're at least going to grab a pen and paper to keep track of the intermediate steps. At that you're no longer keeping more information in your head.
But then again, nobody who actually needs to do arithmetic does it by hand anyway.
Second, please explain how running automated algorithms by hand increases your understanding of, say, e (Euler's number).

>I didn’t make this up, my profsssor told me and didn’t believe him. Then I did it and it worked.
Just because you didn't make X up and you believe X caused Y doesn't mean X actually does cause Y.

>Mastering arithmatic is actually perfect for his goal. It will help him thrive through algebra 1 to Calc 1 courses.
Now you're just repeating yourself.

>He won’t make any simple mistakes and will constantly be focusing on the concepts at hand rather than the arithmatic that makes his answers correct.
If you want to focus on the concepts what you do is grab a calculator to perform the calculations. Spend that time you would have wasted on arithmetic getting better at actual algebra and calculus. Just knowing how to multiply numbers won't help you realize, say, that x=2 is obviously a wrong solution to x^2 + x = 0.


>>
Anonymous 18/01/09(Tue)16:14 No. 16609 ID: 9050ad

>>16608
1)Up to three or four digits is the ideal
2) just saying
3)I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt
4)no, it would.


>>
Anonymous 18/01/09(Tue)19:46 No. 16610 ID: 7854d0
16610

File 151552360578.png - (43.87KB , 549x591 , 5FAE63EC-578E-447E-B578-88FF6979CA54.png )

>>16608
Also it’s not that artihmatic is gonna completely carry though all the way through. But if you study it enough it will build discipline in studying other concepts too. You may run the run the risk of pic related if you don’t have a hard work ethic in either arithmatic or other concepts, but arithmatic is a good place to start. Remember he’s not writing proofs and making conjectures, he’s doing wrote academic math.


>>
Anonymous 18/01/15(Mon)13:24 No. 16613 ID: f9cb15

>>16610
>he’s not writing proofs and making conjectures, he’s doing wrote academic math

College- and university-level math is all about proofs and theorems. If the curriculum of a given school spends any time at all on arithmetic exercises then that's just a shitty school, period.

If you want to build discipline you can do that by doing exercises that are actually relevant. Linear algebra problems involving matrices (e.g. finding linear transformations that meet certain conditions, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, etc.) are difficult to do on a calculator unless you have a pretty high-end one, and it's very easy to fuck up when you copy the values from one step to the next. It's even harder if the course is math-oriented rather than engineering-oriented, because then they'll ask for exact answers, and you can only get those if you use a computer algebra system.

So I stand by what I said. Any amount of time spent on basic arithmetic is time wasted.


>>
Anonymous 18/01/22(Mon)00:19 No. 16617 ID: 7332e9

>>16613
If he’s catching up to college level stuff he has to do highschool math first, best starting with analytic geometry ending somewhere in calculus I or II.
Arithmatic mastery will make the difference between doing well on a timed test, and the discipline from mastering arithmatic when used to master secondary school math concepts will make the difference between getting 80s n 90s vs getting 100s.


>>
Anonymous 18/01/22(Mon)10:08 No. 16618 ID: 2a858b

>>16617
>the discipline from mastering arithmatic when used to master secondary school math concepts
So please explain how arithmetic helps you solve quadratic equations, or systems of linear equations.
Like, if I need to find the exact roots of f(x) = -sqrt(pi) * x^2 + e*x + 10, how does it help me to know how run a multiplication algorithm by hand?


>>
Anonymous 18/02/09(Fri)23:58 No. 16622 ID: bee93c

>>16540
which one



[Return] [Entire Thread] [Last 50 posts]


Delete post []
Password  
Report post
Reason