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Is cold air denser than hot air? Anonymous 18/02/27(Tue)19:46 No. 16630 ID: dfa669
16630

File 151975716827.jpg - (92.68KB , 1024x768 , IMG_0592.jpg )

Plz help


>>
Anonymous 18/02/28(Wed)01:07 No. 16631 ID: a5c275

Yes. You would have known that by now: hot air balloons rise due to the warm air being less dense. The molecules in warm air spread out, becoming less dense, conversely, cold air molecules remain close, making it dense.

-M


>>
Anonymous 18/03/02(Fri)04:56 No. 16632 ID: 6914e6

volume = mass / pressure * temperature * constant

If you hold all the variables on the right side but increase the temperature, the volume also increases, and since density = mass / volume, when the volume increases, the density decreases. So an ideal gas under constant pressure becomes less dense as the temperature increases.




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