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/jew/ - Thrifty Living

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In summary Ghosts 14/07/07(Mon)01:02 No. 2161 ID: 91e813
2161

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Follow all these to save/make money.

1. Do not drink or do drugs. If drink regularly and you find yourself here and broke, there's your problem. You need to deal with that before you can fix your money problems. No thrifty living tip will keep you wealthy and drunk or high, ever.

2. Use reusable house ware items. Do not use paper towel or plastic wrap. Ikea has kitchen towels for $0.50 each. Get about 5 and use them to wipe messes, blow your nose, everything. Get some cheap plastic containers to store food.

3. Shop around and identify the value retailers. Some grocery stores cater to the middle and upper class, and others lower, so find the lower. Depending on your location, there might be small family-run markets that sell fruits and vegetables a little cheaper.

4. Break the spending habit. Stop the psychological justifications your have to buy games, clothes, computer shit, etc. You may need to give all your money for a trusted friend/partner. You should be buying groceries each week and that's all.

5. Always be learning. You can go from zero to a $50k job in a few months if you commit yourself to learning software development online. This may take a large lifestyle change that means no more LoL, Youtube, chans, etc. For starters, see Codecademy and CS50.

6. Don't drive a car. Ride the bus or bike and move if necessary.

Here's a 1 week shopping list (priced from an expensive region, store brand stuff):

2 loaves of bread = $3
500g sliced bologna - $4
24 sliced cheese - $3
Mustard or mayo - $2
3kg of Apples - $6
Chicken soup mix - $2

Only take $20 to the store and go once a week. Notice no frozen pizzas, soda, chips or other kids junk food. Do not buy bulk either. I also suggest but wipes ($3) over toilet paper. You'll need dish soap ($2) and laundry detergent ($4), and learn to use as little as possible. If you don't replace those for months, you're doing it right.

Utilities: T-Mobile has a $40 plan (USA) and Koodo has a $35 plan (Canada). Cancel the Netflix and downgrade the internet. See part 5 for all you need to be doing online anyway.

With phone, your monthly expenses can be $120 - $130 this way. This should only be a temporary way of life as you develop your skills (part 5). Email if you need help.


>>
Modern Mom 14/07/07(Mon)09:26 No. 2164 ID: c2154c
2164

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>>2161
That shit that you listed is junk food. Real shopping list
Once a week
2.5 lbs grass fed beef (expensive in America) but not so expensive in many other countries
7 stocks of broccoli or asparagus
1 stick of butter
1lb bacon
1 carton of eggs

Like 70$ a week for a quality nutritious diet. Not shitty processed meat and bread.


>>
Ghosts 14/07/07(Mon)22:42 No. 2166 ID: 91e813

>>2164

The is /jew/ - Thrifty Living, not /r/keto

Seriously a stick of butter? Apples and bread are junk food? American spotted.


>>
Lrn 2 diet Octavius Del Monte 14/07/08(Tue)05:42 No. 2167 ID: c2154c
2167

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>>2166
You know nothing of health if you think bread is food. Grass fed meat, Veggies, and fats like butter and olive oil is they way to live a quality life. Apples are a shit tier fruit as well. Although I agree with you on the mainstream anti american health views, but they are the kind of idiots that are eating vegetable oil in place of natural healthy fats. These are the kinds of things people evolved eating.

But you probably still cut off the fat from your grain fed steak and think its what is best for you.


>>
biff 14/07/08(Tue)09:52 No. 2168 ID: 3e2241

Do your own cooking and buy in bulk, that's already been said before and totally trumps everything in this thread. It's always good to have SOMEthing you are saving for that is short term, whether it's a drug, new game or whatever, having fun isn't what makes people bad with managing money, being bad at managing money is what makes people unable to have fun. If you save up and go on a weekend of drug using every three months then so be it, as long as it's budgeted and planned then there is no harm, same with computer stuff, clothes etc. You don't have to, and really shouldn't need to buy groceries every week, buying in bulk is easier and far cheaper.

This thread is all over the place...Don't drive a car? A car is a necessity in certain cities where the bus is unreliable and walking isn't feasible.

It's good to try to help, but there is far more worthwhile information in the threads that have been here.


>>
Modern Mom 14/07/08(Tue)16:19 No. 2169 ID: 1b92b3

>>2168


you make me horny

please just keep talking about stuff while you stuff my butt with your cock


>>
Octavius+Del+Monte 14/07/08(Tue)16:54 No. 2170 ID: c2154c

>>2169
I agree, something about the way that guy types. HNNNNNNGGG


>>
Ghosts 14/07/08(Tue)20:25 No. 2171 ID: 91e813

>>2168

I don't recommend buying in bulk for these reasons:

1. You'll spend a lot more in one trip. You could spend $100 - $300 and find yourself broke much faster.

2. You'll consume more. Having that illusion of abundance will lead you to eat carelessly and you'll be without food faster than you think.

3. You might spend more per item. You might buy some name-brand item in bulk, but still spend more or the same as you would on a store brand item elsewhere in non-bulk.

4. There are OTHER COSTS. Studies show Americans especially don't compute costs well, such as travel costs and bulk-store membership costs.

5. Waste. Buying more than you need will lead to things going bad, either through mold or freezer damage and again studies show more goes to waste when you buy bulk.

Buying what you need when you need it is sometimes called "European style" shopping. If gets you the freshest stuff. Spending just $10 to $20 4 times a month is easier to swallow that $100 all at once. It gives you a hard limit on how much you can eat so you don't over-eat. And the reduced size of the load and closer location of the grocery stores means no gas use by car/taxi fare.

You might find the bus unreliable, but accommodate it (leave earlier). Obviously smoking a joint every 3 months is not going to bankrupt you and I wouldn't teetotal that hard, but if you're defending your drug use to me online then maybe you are using it more often than that. Please see part 4 in the OP again.

>>2167

This is a board about frugal living and you're talking about how to get the most hipster, artisan... oils and butters? Jesus.


>>
biff 14/07/08(Tue)22:15 No. 2172 ID: 3e2241

>>2171

>>1.You'll spend a lot more in one trip. You could spend $100 - $300 and find yourself broke much faster.

Doing a budget before you shop alleviates this entirely.

>>2. You'll consume more. Having that illusion of abundance will lead you to eat carelessly and you'll be without food faster than you think.

Again, budgeting, just with portion sizes and the amount or food you prepare.

>>3. You might spend more per item. You might buy some name-brand item in bulk, but still spend more or the same as you would on a store brand item elsewhere in non-bulk.

Again, budgeting...plus not being lured by brand names, although you seem to have the wrong idea of what I meant by buying in bulk. Rice and beans aren't really subject to much branding, same with meats. I'm not talking about buying bulk wonderbread and Bar S bologna here.


>>4. There are OTHER COSTS. Studies show Americans especially don't compute costs well, such as travel costs and bulk-store membership costs.

Once more, when I said bulk I wasn't referring to buying from costco, THAT type of thing would carry those extra costs and the usefulness would be mitigated.

>>5. Waste. Buying more than you need will lead to things going bad, either through mold or freezer damage and again studies show more goes to waste when you buy bulk.

That's why you bulk buy things that don't go to waste, like rice and beans...maybe flour and honey, though bugs can get into flour, but the joke is on them because they add zest to your soups and stews.

>>Buying what you need when you need it is sometimes called "European style" shopping. If gets you the freshest stuff.
Spending just $10 to $20 4 times a month is easier to swallow that $100 all at once. It gives you a hard limit on how much you can eat so you don't over-eat. And the reduced size of the load and closer location of the grocery stores means no gas use by car/taxi fare.

When I said buying in bulk, I unintentionally seem to have given you the idea of someone hefting huge bags of frozen corn and tubs of peanut butter onto a bus and cursing life while doing so. When I buy in bulk this is my list:

3 lbs of beans
3 lbs of rice
2 lbs of meat
flour
3 bags of sugar (for making alcohol lol)

That gets bought at the start of every month like clockwork, so those things never run out. Fruits and vegetables are always best fresh as ya said, so of course those things will be purchased as they're available and in reasonable quantities, nothing is worse than buying tons of cabbage only to have it rot, something that happened to me when I first tried to buy everything in bulk and didn't realize that it only applies to CERTAIN things.

>>You might find the bus unreliable, but accommodate it (leave earlier). Obviously smoking a joint every 3 months is not going to bankrupt you and I wouldn't teetotal that hard, but if you're defending your drug use to me online then maybe you are using it more often than that. Please see part 4 in the OP again.

It IS less reliable compared to driving there yourself, walking or getting a ride though, not that that makes it unfeasible. You have to take at least two buses unless you get the first one to wait for you somehow, I'd rather walk than take the bus for grocery shopping because then there is at least exercise but that's just me. Next, fun things, whether they are drugs, partying, hookers or whatever, are quite necessary unless you plan to sit motionlessly with a straight face when not working, eating or sleeping. Again, BALANCE and BUDGETING. I just bought a cheap tablet and some nootrpics for 75$, that's my whole pleasure budget for the month. I WANTED to add a bunch of kratom to the list and could have done so, but then I'd be justifying things outside of the acceptable levels, which wouldn't be a good thing to do. There are more things than groceries that are needed, and don't even get me started on being thrifty when you've got a girl in the picture. Your words are good, they just need more experience and fine tuning to be applicable to a wide audience, I'm not attacking you, your method just wouldn't work at all for me, if it works well for you then go get em.

>>2169
>>2170
I'm an erotic writer and always need more consultants to help add realism and quality dialogue to my stories, so post your yahoo or skype and we can see what happens ;)


>>
Ghosts 14/07/09(Wed)03:38 No. 2173 ID: 91e813

>>2172
OK, if I misunderstood what you meant by bulk, surely you could have said that in less words. Anyway I agree about that if you are a huge fan of rice. Personally, I found rice more expensive because: (1) I had to buy a rice cooker (2) I had to buy the meat, vegetables, herbs, soy sauce, etc that rice meals require, most of which are highly perishable.

>> Again, budgeting, just with portion sizes and the amount or food you prepare.

Part (most?) of the challenge to living within your means is the psychology. If it was as easy as "just don't spend money" there'd be no reason for tips at all. Buying a little at each time puts a cap on the eating.

>> Your words are good, they just need more experience and fine tuning to be applicable to a wide audience.

Thanks, but I actually disagree and think we both need to define our audiences more narrowly. I mean to write this for people temporarily living cheaply. Really, I mean to write it for the past version of myself. For you, maybe you are writing for a frugal lifestyle. If we define our intended audience more we can have contrary ideas that don't really conflict since they might both be true in their respective situations.

In my case, suggesting people buy drugs and cheap tablets is not good advice. There is nothing sadder to see than a poor person taking drugs for a mood lifter, getting in trouble, losing what little they have, getting addicted and so on. It's a bad combination and extremely common. And I'm concerned that you're so defensive about your drug use. It's your life, but maybe defending it here is irresponsible.

>> You have to take at least two buses

Believe it or not, this is what many people do every day. Having been a driver, I know that transition is hard, especially depending on your community. But it really pays off.

If you want/need to buy bulk AND you don't have a bulk place in walking distance AND your buses really suck, maybe think about moving. That's 3 problems that will suck money from you no matter where else you cut corners. Consider a city and neighbourhood with a great transit system and grocers nearby. You might find a better job market, a change of scenery and a fresh start too.


>>
biff 14/07/09(Wed)05:30 No. 2174 ID: 3e2241

>>2173

Works for me, although I don't see how I'm being defensive about my drug usage, they're something I use from time to time and that's that. My point wasn't that drugs or cheap tablets are good, just that it's no good to not do anything you enjoy at all. Whatever you enjoy has the potential to cost you money but that doesn't make it a bad thing to be avoided.

I think you hit the nail on the head by saying that your advice is for those who want to "temporarily live cheaply", for me it's a total mindset, sort of like the difference between repeatedly going on diets versus changing the way you eat on the whole, thrifty living isn't something I am doing temporarily, but more power to you :)


>>
Modern Mom 14/07/21(Mon)18:52 No. 2202 ID: 857606

40 dollars a month on phone plane.

You have to be joking.

Black wireless/h20, platinum tell, att gophone, republic wireless. All of them below ten dollars a month. Same fucking network, less pricey.

I pay 3 dollars a month for da phone shit I hardly use- on a lumia 520 I got for 7 dollars. Oh you want unlimited? Rep wireless is like 10 bucks for that. And to be clear, you can just not have a phone, or have a voip number for free/near-free so work can call you.

Go buy some toilet paper OP, and buy some frozen pizzas, they're great tasting and only cost like 80 cents.

Transportation is hard. I got a scooter, but I realize thats not for everyone. Costs about the same as a used car, but very cheap to drive/maintain. Fuck riding the bus.


>>
Modern Mom 14/07/27(Sun)06:14 No. 2209 ID: e65a14

>>2161
>1. If you spend money on drugs then you will have less money.
>2. A one-time expense may save you money over a cheaper price that you have to pay over and over.
>3. Stores aren't legally required to sell everything at the same price.
>4. If you spend money on luxury items then you will have less money.
>5. Education opens up opportunities to make money.
>6. If you spend money on gas then you will have less money.

If you want to have more money then all you have to do is take obvious steps to spend less money and make more money. Isn't this thread just retarded?


>>
Modern Mom 14/07/29(Tue)06:42 No. 2213 ID: e22576

>>2209
Basically it's just: make money, don't buy things you can't afford, don't buy things that are completely unnecessary, budget your money, save your money each month, consider each investment for time saved/enjoyment vs price.


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Modern Mom 15/09/04(Fri)13:10 No. 2727 ID: 4c030b
2727

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>>2173
>Personally, I found rice more expensive because: (1) I had to buy a rice cooker

>I had to buy a rice cooker
>had to buy
are you serious? throw some rice in a pot, wash it with a little water, then put the tip of your thumb on the top of the rice and fill water up to your first knuckle. Bring to a boil then cover and simmer for idgaf 20 minutes for white rice longer for brown or jasmine. there I just saved you more money than all your posts saved me.


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Modern Mom 15/09/26(Sat)03:03 No. 2737 ID: 7a116d

>>2173
Ghosts, as an econ major I have to say this...

You're a moron, your list is shit, and you should feel bad. Though I can't fault you for trying at least.


>>
Modern Mom 15/12/20(Sun)01:37 No. 2785 ID: cd6617

You're all fucking retarded. Buy pulses, grains, and legumes in bulk (I can get 50lbs of rice for your $20 and plan for months, not 'a week' of meals all within a set budget). Canned fish, cheap cooking oils, baking powder/soda, dried chiles, whole olives, canned tomatoes, nuts, seeds, popcorn, honey these are all good pantry items to buy on clearance. Set aside an amount (a SMALL amount) every day to buy fresh produce and fresh meat (preferably lean meats like fish and poultry) and try to do it at a market in walking or biking distance - suburban shitholes may be condemned to driving though. Invest in a spice cabinet and grow your own herbs. If you have land, invest in a garden. Gardening is exercise, thrift, and nutrition all in one. Also, if you have land, get chickens so you can have eggs every day. You'd be amazed at what fresh eggs and produce can get you. I used to trade fresh zucchini for free meals at my local Greek diner. Prepare your own meals with emphasis on speed, simplicity, and quality/freshness of ingredients. Half of Italy functions on garlic and oil pasta you can make in 20min. Buy whole chickens and debone them on your own, save the bones with your vegetable trimmings to make stock. I'm still siping on stock from the fucking Thanksgiving turkey.

Stay away from: alcohol, refined sugar, soda (this falls under refined sugar but I feel it bears restatement), video games, restaurants (eating out really should be an occasional thing), commutes that require long drives for they tend to push you into fast food, and romance.


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Modern Mom 15/12/24(Thu)05:53 No. 2788 ID: b3c5ac

>>2785
Totally agree but I feel like the no romance part is kinda harsh. I feel like life is about sharing experiences and developing shared connections, if you give them up you're no longer living and just existing. Sometimes on this board people take thrift to the extreme.


>>
Modern Mom 15/12/29(Tue)15:19 No. 2790 ID: 418d7a

>>2788
>thrift to the extreme
Yes, because these people don't have money and never will because they are always spending it like the rest of us.
Controlling psychological needs? Heck, if you can do that you wouldn't need the advice in the first place because you could decide for yourself what you need and limit yourself to that.
No one is going to benefit from your advice OP, and its not because its bad advice, it's because the reason people are bad with money is because they lack discipline in the first place.
Once you gain discipline, it doesn't matter what you buy or how much you buy because you're always going to understand how much you should be saving and what prudent purchases are.
If anything, this advice will just lead those already undisciplined people down a cold turkey road where they will quickly believe is too harsh. They will grow to fear discipline and instead will return to their old habits.
A long, slow change is superior than focusing on specifics like beans or butter or any of that crap. That has nothing to do with money, thats just your preference and the limit of your nutritional knowledge.


>>
Modern Mom 16/01/30(Sat)16:30 No. 2806 ID: 716d81

>2. Use reusable house ware items. Do not use paper towel or plastic wrap. Ikea has kitchen towels for $0.50 each. Get about 5 and use them to wipe messes, blow your nose, everything. Get some cheap plastic containers to store food.
I beg to differ. Sometimes disposable paper kitchen towels is the only ting that can do the job. Not that it should be used for everything.


>>
Modern Mom 16/02/17(Wed)22:58 No. 2811 ID: 09a3b2

I eat very cheap.

Potatoes and beans are great as you fill full without eating much and there are lots of protein.
Home baked high fiber bread is also good and cheap.
Frozen veggies, spice, broth and noodles makes a cheap, healthy ramen soup.
Beans are great with both bread and rice.
Potatoes are great by them selves just cooked or baked, with a little salt and some spices.
I also "splurge" on fish and lean chicken to eat healthier.
All in all I eat for no money and am still eating healthy, and getting all the things my body need.


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Modern Mom 17/01/16(Mon)23:59 No. 2942 ID: 99dc99

>>2161
>butt wipes
>toilet paper

If you want to be thrifty, just clean up the pajeet way. You're just going to wash your hands after you wipe anyway, might as well put something on them to clean off.



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